Birch Bark Tray
Birch Bark Tray
Birch Bark Tray
Birch Bark Tray
Birch Bark Tray
Birch Bark Tray

Birch Bark Tray

Regular price $100.00 $0.00 Unit price per

Hand harvested winter bark (wigwas), hand harvested spruce root for tying basket (kawandegos jisen), black ash rim, hand picked sweet grass (wishpemishkos) and etched design.

Created by Potawatomi Artist Kristy Phillips,

Teachings in the description offered by Kristy Phillips.

 

Eagle: 10 in x 7 in 

Scissortail: 10 in x 7 1/2 in

The scissortail is the state bird of Oklahoma and the feathers are used in ceremony. The scissortail is an image of Oklahoma etched on birch bark from the great lakes. This piece exhibits the combination of great lakes and Oklahoma as our ancestors made a new home in Oklahoma after the Trail of Death. This basket is woven with spruce root, has a black ash rim, lined with sweet grass, and is etched onto winter birch bark. All items are hand harvested by Neshnabkwewek.

Sengo: 10 in x 7 1/2 in

The squirrel had many teachings to Potawatomi people who were displaced after the trail of death.  The squirrel is an important source of food and used to this day in many ceremonies. The squirrel always knows where home is and has a good sense of community. This basket is woven with spruce root, has a black ash rim, lined with sweet grass, and is etched onto winter birch bark. All items are hand harvested by Neshnabkwewek.

 

Honeysuckle: 10 in x 7 1/2 in

Honeysuckle is an easily identified plant and can be found from Upper Peninsula of Michigan to Oklahoma. Below the honeysuckle is the thunderbird. The thunderbirds are naturally found on birch bark and there are many stories about the relationship between thunderbirds and wigwas (birch bark). This basket is woven with spruce root, has a black ash rim, lined with sweet grass, and is etched onto winter birch bark. All items are hand harvested by Neshnabkwewek.

 

Turtle (dark wood): 8 1/2 in x 7 1/2 in

Turtle (natural wood): 9 1/2 in x 7 1/2 in

The word mshike is used in many indigenous languages across turtle island. The neshnabe see the word mshike as the turtle. The turtle travels sacred waters to bring messages from earth to the manido (spirit). In Nahuatl from central Mexico mshike means “the initiated” according to late elder Andres Segura. In the Yezidi language mshike means the anointed one. The word mshike is a unifier across turtle island to remind indigenous people that from the eagle to the condor we are part of a global indigenous network


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